The Butler Did It

An entertaining writing lesson. 🙂

Rachel Carrera, Novelist

Writers, you have got to watch this!  Normally I am not a fan of Al’s (at all!), but this definitely kept my attention… and made me laugh.  Trust me.  The less than four minute investment will be worth it.

Time to talk:  Are you guilty of any of the crimes depicted in this video?  Which do you appreciate more: the lyrics or the graphic art that went into the making of this video?  Do you like anything by Al?

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Timeout Tuesday

As I prepare to take on the whirlwind joy ride of NaNoWriMo Friday at midnight, I’m finding joy in taking deep breaths of relaxation this week.

Zoey - Pumpkin patch 2014-3

Fall-MN-5

Fall-MN-2

“Keep your faith in all beautiful things. In the sun when it is hidden. In the spring when it is gone.”
— Roy Rolfe Gilson
Carpe Diem

Looking for Stars

Beautiful and poignant. Michelle certainly has way with words.

wolff den press

We’re down here searching the night sky for your star.

I say we.

I know I’m not alone in this.

Do you hear our eyes asking? Is it this one? That one?

Do you see our faces confused and wondering?

Can you hear the hope in our pounding hearts?

I pick one and make a wish on light that left the source a million years before breath filled my lungs.

What else is there to do but wait another million years to stop searching? To stop wishing against reality?

In a world of endless sequels and reruns, accepting that a story has ended is nearly impossible.

So we tell your story as best we remember it,

And we look for stars.

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reading-5 ways to help an author

Great post by Shawn Bird. Please stop by and visit her blog so full of energy and enthusiasm! You’ll be glad you did. 🙂

Shawn L. Bird

Most of a publishing house’s marketing budget goes to its most popular, A-list authors.  You know: the ones least in need of the promotion.  If you have found a mid-list or new author whose work you enjoy, you can become a crucial, and very appreciated, part of his/her success.  What’s more, your enthusiasm may encourage him/her to keep writing!  Here’s how.

1. Leave honestly positive reviews everywhere you can:  Goodreads, Amazon, Kobo, your library, iBooks.  Tell people what you really liked about the book’s characters, themes, setting, style, and the genre on your blog, Facebook, Twitter, and anywhere else you can think of.  Reviews are key for a new reader to take a risk on an unknown author.

2. Tell your friends!  If you have a friend who likes the genre, recommend the book.  But, do the author a favour.  If your friends read romance, don’t recommend a horror…

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Goodbye to a Young Friend & Don’t Use Tragedy as Ammo for Gun Rights

My friend Michelle has such a huge heart and a beautiful way with words.

wolff den press

Not on the same day a tragedy occurs. Not now when friends and family are reading your troll-ish, shit stirring comments below the news articles which by the way got all the facts wrong and leave me shaking my head wondering if reporters do any fact checking at all.  You want to talk about gun rights do it on your own time. Do it on your own blog, your own Facebook page or keep your evil to yourself.  A child is dead, our friend is dead and he is not a trophy for you to use for your personal cause against guns.

No one who knew Shawn Kilker is surprised that he killed a relative and then killed himself. No one can get their head around whose life he took before he took his own.  No one can believe that he shot his own son Keith.  Not so hard to…

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Dear Writer … it’s not all about you, ya know! – a reminder

Saw this re-blogged on writingwingsforyou.com (please check out Marie’s amazing blog) and thought this deserves mention on yet another. Wonderful article on being kind and considerate to other authors, supporting one another in this amazing journey. Have a beautiful weekend! 🙂

Books: Publishing, Reading, Writing

I was going to write a blog post about social media and how I’ve been paring down my use of it, because I’m finding it to be not all that social or the best media for me at the moment. After discussing with a fellow author how disappointing Twitter is (and she cleverly described T. as “like a 4-lane highway at rush hour with cars bumper-to-bumper. It makes me nervous”), I realized what bothers me isn’t not being able to navigate and use Twitter properly, but more the barrage of Tweeps who constantly tweet: Look at me! Aren’t I clever! Buy my book!

Now I’m not saying that I don’t do some self-promotion on there, but I do try to balance that with tweets of value to others, including promoting fellow authors. And I also offer, up front in my profile, what I am prepared do for other Tweeps. Most…

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engineering artistry

This post was brought to my attention by the author (and one of my cabin mates for Camp NaNo.) as I shared my struggle to turn off my inner editor. The message is so profound I wanted to share it with you. (Second day of Camp NaNo and I’m already ahead in knowledge! Thanks Shawn! 🙂 )

Shawn L. Bird

There’s an artist and an engineer on your team.  They have different skills and you need to use both of them!  (Sylvia Taylor)

Sylvia Taylor presented a very practical workshop on editing at the Shuswap Lake International Writers’ Festival, and this quote is from that workshop.  Our very exacting and critical left brain and our very creative right brain can either work against one another or with each other.  This lesson is a very practical one for writers.

In this case, there is an “I” in team, since both members of the team are in our own head. When they’re fighting for our attention, nothing productive happens.  While our right brain is happily thinking up new plots and dialogue, our left brain is telling us our ideas are stupid and forcing us to second guess every line.  Sylvia recommended harnessing the ‘engineer’ of the right brain by doing timed…

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